Jamaica Biennial 2017 – Invited Artists – Judy Ann MacMillan

Judy Ann MacMillan – Self Portrait Wearing a Crown of Thorns (2016)

The work of Judy Ann MacMillan in the Jamaica Biennial 2017 is on view in the main exhibition at the National Gallery of Jamaica.

Judy Ann MacMillan was born in 1945, St Andrew Jamaica. MacMillan attended the Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, Dundee (Scotland) where she attained a Diploma of Art. A classical painter, she is best known for her acutely observed portraits, landscapes and still lifes. She is a regular exhibitor both locally and internationally, including the Annual National and Biennial exhibitions at the National Gallery of Jamaica. Her most recent solo exhibition was titled Judy Ann Macmillan, Still Painting, which was held at the French Embassy in Kingston in 2016. Among her achievements, was her induction in the Hall of Fame of the Caribbean Foundation for the Arts, for outstanding contribution in the field of art in 2007. MacMillan lives in Kingston, Jamaica.

Website: www.judyannmacmillan.com

Judy Ann MacMillan – Village Venus (2016)

Jamaica Biennial 2017 – Invited Artists: Prudence Lovell

Prudence Lovell – Untitled (…a huge and birdless silence) (2017), collage, detail

The Jamaica Biennial 2017 features a four-panel collage by Prudence Lovell, of which two panels are illustrated here. The work can be viewed until May 28 at the National Gallery of Jamaica in downtown Kingston.

Prudence Lovell was born in Framlingham, Suffolk, England. Lovell was educated at the Kingston on Thames Art College and at the Manchester Polytechnic, in England. She has for many years taught at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, School of Visual Arts and produces works in paint, collage and drawing media. She has exhibited locally and internationally and this includes many exhibitions at the National Gallery of Jamaica, most recently Explorations 3: Seven Women Artists in 2015 and Digital in 2016. “The present work seeks to illuminate the contemporary moment of instability and hazard. It contemplates battered black boxes as metaphors for destruction and peril but also as repositories of explanation and knowledge, at the same time as using them as vehicles for allegory and allusion. Collage and imagery reveal and conceal in equal measure but neither the title, ‘..a huge and birdless silence’ (taken from a Philip Larkin poem), nor the work itself offers any ultimate comfort.” Lovell lives in St Andrew, Jamaica.

Prudence Lovell – Untitled (…a huge and birdless silence) (2017), collage, detail

Jamaica Biennial 2017 – Invited Artists: Amy Laskin

Amy Laskin – Coral Incognito (n.d.)

Amy Laskin’s work in the Jamaica Biennial 2017 can be seen at the National Gallery of Jamaica.

Amy Laskin was born in 1955, in Philadelphia, USA. Laskin attended the Pennsylvania State University where she was awarded a BFA degree in Ceramic Sculpture in 1977. She also holds an MFA in Painting (1979) from the School of Fine Art Institute in Chicago. Amy Laskin has been living in Jamaica since 1986 and had her first solo exhibition at the Bolivar Gallery in Kingston in 1989. She is best known for her highly detailed and surrealist paintings, which feature tropical and marine plants, corals and lace garments. She has exhibited widely in both the USA and Jamaica and in 2015 participated in Explorations 3: Seven Women Artists at the National Gallery of Jamaica. She lives in St Andrew, Jamaica.

Website: www.amyclaskin.com

Jamaica Biennial 2017 – Invited Artists: Rafiki Kariuki

Rafiki Kariuki – Depths (2016)

Rafiki Kariuki is represented with two works in the Jamaica Biennial 2017 and both can be seen at the National Gallery of Jamaica on the Kingston Waterfront. The Biennial continues until May 28.

Rafiki Kariuki was born in 1951, in Kingston, Jamaica. He attended the Jamaica School of Art where he obtained a Diploma in Painting, 1980. Karuiki has been regular exhibitor, particularly in the Annual National and Biennial exhibitions at the National Gallery and various themed exhibitions at the now defunct Mutual Gallery, in Kingston. In 1994 he was awarded a silver medal in the Jamaica Festival Fine Art Exhibition. He lives in Kingston, Jamaica.

 

Rafiki Kariuki – Bridging the Gap (2016-17)

Jamaica Biennial 2017 – Invited Artists: Marlon James

Marlon James – Blackout: Kingston 12, Jamaica (2013-2014)

The Jamaica Biennial 2017 submissions by Marlon James can be seen at the National Gallery of Jamaica until May 28. The works from the Blackout: Kingston 12 series were first published in Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism under a grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Marlon James was born in 1980, in Kingston, Jamaica. He attended the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts and graduated with a Diploma in Sculpture. He began working as a photographer while still a student and it soon became his primary medium. As a commercial and fine arts photographer, his work has been published and exhibited locally and internationally. While his photographic practice is quite diverse, James is best known for his provocative portraits of fellow artists and persons who challenge societal norms, who are presented in both an iconic and candid fashion. His recent exhibitions include his solo exhibition entitled Intimate Encounters (2013) at NLS in Kingston Jamaica, the Jamaica Biennial 2014, and the Jamaican Routes exhibition in 2016, in Oslo, Norway. He currently lives in Cascade, Trinidad.

Website: www.marlonjamesphotography.com

 

Marlon James – Couple Strangers (2016)

Jamaica Biennial 2017 – Invited Artists: Laura Facey

Laura Facey – Ceiba (2016)

Laura Facey has two works in the Jamaica Biennal 2017: one, Ceiba, is on view at the National Gallery of Jamaica in downtown Kingston; the other, Bumpy Top Desk and Mirror, can be seen at Devon House. The Biennial continues at all locations until May 28.

Laura Facey was born in 1954, in Kingston, Jamaica. She attended the Jamaica School of Art where she attained a Diploma in Sculpture, 1975. She also attended the West Surrey College of Art and Design in England and the Rhode Island School of Design, USA. Facey is best known as a sculptor but also works in other media, such as drawing, painting and printmaking. In recent times, she turned her attention to large meditative pieces that explore the symbolic and cultural potential of natural wood forms and human tools and instruments. She has exhibited extensively locally and internationally. Her work as been featured in major publications such as the Small Axe journal and her many commissions include the famed Redemption Song (2003) monument in Emancipation Park, Kingston. Her awards include the Silver Musgrave Medal (2006) and the Aaron Matalon Award for her entry in the 2010 National Biennial. In 2014, she was conferred with the Order of Distinction (Commander Class) by the Government of Jamaica. Facey lives in St Ann, Jamaica.

Website: laurafacey.com

 

Laura Facey – Bumpy Top Desk and Mirror (2016)