Young Talent 2015: Avagay Osborne

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Avagay Osborne – Untitled (2015)

Here is another of our short posts on the artists in the Young Talent 2015 exhibition, which opens tomorrow, Sunday, August 30:

Avagay Osborne was born in 1990 in Manchester, Jamaica. She is a recent graduate of the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, where she attained a BFA in Painting. She lives in Manchester, Jamaica.

Avagay Osborne - "Sorry"  (2015)

Avagay Osborne – “Sorry” (2015)

Artist’s Statement

Self-recovery is the term applied to the process of healing, from general disturbances and trauma. Reflections on past experiences have provided a thematic substance to my work thus far. My work is a direct reflection, response and act of self-recovery from a series of personal events and near-traumatic experiences. I believe that though these experiences are personal they are also no doubt a part of overall human condition. My adolescent years were troubled and traumatic and at age 23, I went through another traumatic experience, I have endured some level of physical and emotional abuse during these periods and these traumatic experiences have influenced my works.

Avagay Osborne - Untitled (2015)

Avagay Osborne – Untitled (2015)

Young Talent 2015: Richard Nattoo

Richard Nattoo - Oblivion (2015)

Richard Nattoo – Oblivion (2015)

Here is another of our short posts on the artists in the Young Talent 2015 exhibition, which opens on Sunday, August 30:

Richard Nattoo was born 1993, in St Catherine, Jamaica. Nattoo currently attends the University of Technology in Kingston, Jamaica, where he is pursuing the Bachelors of Arts in Architectural Studies.

Richard Nattoo – Athena’s Oculus (2015)

Artist’s Statement

Exploration has always been a constant in my life, and an integral part of my art and artistic processes. I create in an attempt to capture and deconstruct the common feelings and emotions of everyday life, so that I can examine their inner workings. At its core, my work attempts to capture the feelings and emotions I experience and to translate them into the surreal spaces that we all inhabit within ourselves. The goal is to explore feelings and emotions on murky cerebral levels and to construct the tumultuous and beautiful inner world that resides within all of us. I call this inner world the Silent Echo and my exhibitions have been about exploring this rich and textured place. A variety of mediums such as pen and ink, watercolour and most recently glass have been employed. Each exhibition is a chapter of the journey deconstructed.

Richard Nattoo - Silent Intuition (2015)

Richard Nattoo – Silent Intuition (2015)

Young Talent 2015: Howard Myrie

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Here is the seventh of our short posts on the artists in the Young Talent 2015 exhibition, which opens on August 30:

Howard Myrie was born in 1982 in Cambridge, St James, Jamaica.  He is a recent graduate of The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts where he received his BFA in Painting. He currently resides in St James, Jamaica.

Artist’s statement

In Jamaican culture, the issue of homosexuality is a volatile and controversial topic, with persons on both side of the debate having fiery passions and each side being sure that their perspective is the correct one. My work seeks to engage in the discussion through a variety of media such as video installation that is text based, wood carving with graffiti elements, and text on glass.  These media are used as a way of participating in the discourse, pointing to social ills and asking important questions that are worthy of attention, while allowing space for contemplation and reflection on personal attitudes.  The Instrumentalist theory of art states that art should do more than being decorative or beautiful; art should be able to facilitate change and make society and the world we live in a better place.

Young Talent: Domanie Hong

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Here is the sixth of our short posts on the artists in the Young Talent 2015 exhibition, which opens on August 30:

Domanie Hong (née Denniston) was born in Kingston, Jamaica in 1989. She graduated from the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts with a BFA in Printmaking in 2015. She currently teaches at Hillel Academy High School.

Artist’s Statement

This body of work comprises of three concepts, journaling my personal life experiences and predictions of the future. The first concept, titled The Water Series, signifies the start of my journey. During pregnancy, the womb is filled with water enabling the creation of human life.

The second concept, The Red Series, depicts the psychosomatic nature of human emotions. The bright attractive colour sends mixed signals to the neurons in the hippocampus, which plays a role in emotions.

The third concept, The Desert and Textured Series, represents the end of a journey and expresses the notion of returning to dust.

This body of work represents a visual discussion of my struggles with self-worth and self-acceptance. These concepts are the unwanted realities of my life and represent a visual conversation with its cycles.

Young Talent 2015: Monique Gilpin

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Here is the fifth of our short posts on the artists in the Young Talent 2015 exhibition, which opens on August 30:

Monique Gilpin was born in 1985 in Montego Bay, St James, Jamaica. She graduated in 2006 from the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, where she majored in Painting and Photography. She currently lives in Montego Bay, where she works as Assistant Curator at National Gallery West at the Montego Bay Cultural Centre.

Artist’s Statement

The Porcelain Series is a dialogue between the concepts of stability and instability and also the traditional and contemporary realities of life. Born from my nomadic experiences within the last six years, my yearning for stability is embodied within the exploration of the human form in a three-dimensional space. Every minute of our lives is spent in physical and psychological dialogue with the space around us and the contorted bodies within these oversaturated three-dimensional spaces have been transmogrified towards semi-abstraction mimicking hard ceramic surfaces. The porcelain figurines in many older Jamaican homes seem to be ever-present and are symbolic of a stability that the younger generation of Jamaicans no longer seem to be able to achieve. The contortions and attempted transformation of the bodies represent the psychological struggle to achieve this stability.