Last Sundays to Screen the Film “Inna De Yard” + Live Discussion w/ Peter Webber

At 1:30 pm on November 29, 2020 the National Gallery of Jamaica in association with the Jamaica Film and Television Association (JAFTA) will feature an online screening of the film “Inna De Yard” followed by a discussion with the film’s director Peter Webber for its virtual Last Sundays.

Kiddus I, The Rebel (Image courtesy of Charades)

More than 30 years after their golden age, a band of singers gather up for the recording of a new album before embarking on a World Tour. Voices of Reggae like Ken Boothe, Winston McAnuff, Kiddus I, Judy Mowatt, and Cedric Myron, the famous lead of the Congos, are but a few in this film. These artistes have known each other for years and the have contributed greatly to the development of reggae: they’ve sung with the greats and rubbed shoulders with Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Jimmy Cliff. For the project “Inna de Yard”, they’ve reunited to revisit the biggest tracks of their repertoire and record a unique acoustic album, returning to the sources of their music. On this occasion, they’ll share the microphone with younger singers, representatives of the new reggae stage uniting their energy in a collective, powerful vibration.

Jah 9 (Image courtesy of Charades)

In this film the director, Peter Webber, takes us along for the recording of the album, which will be the soundtrack, as well as the everyday life of the singers for several weeks. His aim is to get to grips with reggae, and at the same time witness the intimate lives of some of the legendary personalities that helped to create it. Built around a series of portraits, and giving star billing to the reggae music that will permeate it from beginning to end, the film invites us on a visceral and musical voyage to discover reggae and some of the fascinating people who create and perform it every day.

Growing up in West London in the 1970’s, Peter Webber was surrounded by reggae music. There was a large and well-established Jamaican community and the Notting Hill Carnival, the capital’s biggest street party, throbbed to the sounds of it. He was a fan of The Clash, who often promoted reggae music and that impacted him deeply. His record collection was soon filled with reggae albums and he sought out iconic reggae films such as “The Harder They Come” and “Rockers.” Webber eventually visited Jamaica and saw the opportunity for stories to be told through the intersection of the old and new generations of reggae.

To view the film and discussion please click the following link:

http://cet-it.com/live/ngj-inna-de-yard-the-soul-of-jamaica-screening-discussion/

For more educational and entertaining content subscribe and follow us on:-YouTube NationalGalleryofJamaica
-Instagram @nationalgalleryofjamaica
-Twitter @natgalleryja
-Facebook at NationalGalleryofJamaica.

Teachers’ Webinar: Programme Schedule and Speakers

For the Education Department’s upcoming Teachers’ Webinar on Saturday, November 14, 2020, kindly see the event’s programme in addition to information about the moderator and presenters.

About the moderator:

Kirt Henry currently serves as Assistant Curator and head of the Education Department at the National Gallery of Jamaica. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in History and Heritage Studies with a minor in Cultural Studies from The University of the West Indies, Mona. Presently, He is pursuing a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree at the Institute of Caribbean Studies (UWI, Mona). Kirt’s research focuses on the production of meaning through dress forms in Revival rituals and ceremonies across postcolonial Jamaica. He has served as an adjunct lecturer at The UWI, Mona where he taught courses on African religious retentions, fashion and material culture in the Caribbean.  

About the presenters: 

Monique Barnett-Davidson is the acting Senior Curator at the National Gallery of Jamaica. She holds a B.F.A. in Painting from the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts (Kingston, Jamaica) and an M.A in Heritage Studies from the University of the West Indies (Mona). Since 2007, Monique has worked in various aspects of the visual arts in Jamaica including art education, exhibition programming and development, as well as art museum education and research. From 2006 to 2010, she also worked as an art teacher, mainly at the secondary school level. She has been a lead coordinator for several educational programmes at the NGJ including public forums, outreach initiatives and workshops. 

Cristal Clayton- Wallace has been employed to the National Gallery of Jamaica (NGJ) as a Curatorial Assistant since 2014. She is a graduate of The Mico University College where she attained a B.A. in Visual Arts Education. In 2018 she represented the NGJ at the annual Museum Association of the Caribbean (MAC) Conference in Barbados after being awarded a MAC Fellowship to attend. Periodically, Cristal has worked as co-coordinator and coordinator for the Saturday Art Time Programme and the Multicare Summer Art on The Waterfront Programme respectively. In addition she also writes the NGJ’s contributions to the All about Sweet Jamaica section of the Observer’s Junior Study Centre.   

Dwayne Lyttle is a graduate of the St. Joseph’s Teachers’ College where he attained a Diploma in Primary Education. His professional focus includes the areas of cultural education, instructional communication and visual arts instruction. Currently, he is employed to the National Gallery of Jamaica as a Curatorial Assistant, in the Education Department. Within this department, Lyttle develops educational programmes, does research, conducts tours and periodically executes workshop training as well as visual arts classes for children. In 2016 he co-authored with Monique Barnett Davidson, a paper titled Adapt or Perish: An Assessment of Emerging Museum Educational Strategies at the National Gallery of Jamaica, published in the Museum Association of the Caribbean’s online Journal, Caribbean Museum.

NGJ Teachers’ Webinar: “Supporting Art, Experiences and Learners”

The National Gallery of Jamaica (NGJ) will be hosting its Teachers’ Webinar, via the NGJ’s YouTube Channel, on Saturday, November 14, 2020 at 1:00 PM. The live-streamed event is being coordinated by the NGJ Education Department under the theme “Supporting Art, Experiences and Learners”

The Teachers’ Webinar is a special edition of NGJ’s annual Teachers’ Seminar series, which was initiated in 2014 and specifically designed to equip, train and support teachers and teachers-in-training, to effectively incorporate the museum as a resource space. This webinar is coordinated as an extension of the Art-Ed Support project, which was initiated by the NGJ Education Department in July 2020 and entails a series of online art educational initiatives, designed to provide informational resources for a variety of scholastic and academic activities associated with the study and application of visual arts. 

The management of NGJ believes that the webinar will create opportunities for the NGJ to connect with a wider audience of educational professionals, regardless of the discipline or grade level. Key objectives for the NGJ’s Teachers’ Webinar will be to delineate procedures, concerning research and accessing NGJ educational services, as well as providing participants with information on how to apply museum resources in lesson planning.

Moderated by Assistant Curator in Education, Mr. Kirt Henry, with opening remarks delivered by Chief Curator, Mr. O’Neil Lawrence; the webinar will feature presentations from Curatorial Assistants, Mr. Dwayne Lyttle and Mrs. Cristal Clayton-Wallace. A preview video for the Webinar, entitled, “Education through the Museum Experience”, presented by Senior Curator, Mrs. Monique Barnett-Davidson – will premiere on the NGJ’s YouTube Channel, on Saturday, November 7, 2020. 

There are no registration requirements or costs associated with the NGJ Teachers’ Webinar; however, the event will not have open access. To view the webinar simply enter, or click on the following video:

The link will also be posted on the National Gallery of Jamaica’s Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.  For more information, email the NGJ Education Department at educate@natgalja.org.jm, or call at (876) 922-1561, (876) 922-1563 or (876) 618-0654. You can follow the National Gallery of Jamaica, on the above-mentioned platforms and at the NGJ Blog, https://nationalgalleryofjamaica.wordpress.com.

Virtual Last Sundays to ft. Courtni

For the National Gallery of Jamaica’s upcoming virtual Last Sundays on October 25, 2020 we will be featuring a musical performance by vocalist Courtni as well as, interviews with The Hon. Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange MP, CD and Barbara Blake Hannah OD regarding the Jamaica Jamaica! exhibition. The video performance will premiere on our YouTube and Instagram pages at 1:30pm.

Hailing from the tourist city of Montego Bay, Jamaica, Courtni was born into a musical family. Early on she was encouraged to pursue her passion for music and as a result, she learned to play the piano at the tender age of six. Courtni draws inspiration from many artistes and groups including Bach, Ella Fitzgerald, Toots and the Maytals, Nirvana and Beyoncé.

Courtni is currently enrolled at the Edna Manley School of the Visual and Performing Arts where she is pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Music Performance. At just twenty-five years old, she knows there is still much to learn and is eager to dive into the entertainment industry headfirst. Following graduation, she plans to not only pursue her lifelong dream of being a recording artiste but to also work as a composer and producer.

For more educational and entertaining content subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on:

-Instagram @nationalgalleryofjamaica
-Twitter @natgalleryja
-Facebook at NationalGalleryofJamaica.

In Memoriam, Beverley Oliver (1956-2020)

*This is the final article in a number of In Memoriam tributes that were announced in April of this year.

Beverly Oliver – Mumma (Image provided by The Jamaican Magazine)

In recognition of the passing of painter Beverley Oliver (born Beverley Edmond), the National Gallery of Jamaica would like to reflect on her contributions to the Jamaican artistic community.

Born on May 22, 1956 to renowned Jamaican painter Milton George, Oliver covered every surface she could find as a young child with bright colours. Rather than being discouraged by her elders she was sent to the Institute of Jamaica’s Junior Centre at the age of nine and encouraged by her father’s unrestrained painting style she was convinced that this was going to be her career path. 

As an adolescent this dream faded replaced by other activities and concerns and the responsibilities of adulthood and childrearing soon took over seemingly ended her painterly aspirations. With her father’s encouragement that reignited her passion, Oliver returned to painting at age forty in 1996. Characterized as a woman with a “seemingly inexhaustible imagination”, Oliver’s open-ended and free-spirited approach to applying paint is found in prayer which she identified to have been her source of inspiration. As with artists within the landscape of Jamaican painters, Oliver over the years has developed her personal style by the ways in which she has invented and depicted people, situations and things in life through her works. 

Matured in her personal style and ability to produce artworks, Oliver started exhibiting at Harmony Hall and the National Gallery of Jamaica. In 1996, Oliver’s first painting From Beyond was featured as a part of the Annual National Exhibition of the National Gallery of Jamaica. Additionally, Oliver has had her work “represented in the USA by CAVIN-MORRIS Gallery in New York”. Her works have been purchased by collectors in international destinations such as Hong Kong, Israel, Zimbabwe, Mexico and Sweden. The artist community recognizes Beverley Oliver for her contribution to visual arts in Jamaica. 

She passed away on February 12, 2020. The Board of Directors and the staff of the National Gallery wish to extend our condolences to the family and friends of Beverley Oliver.   


 1P53-54 Van Asbroek, Herman. The All-Seeing I: Exploring the Imagination of Beverley Oliver 83-86 Ibid, P53-54

Please note Ms. Oliver’s passing was unrelated to COVID-19

Virtual Last Sundays to ft. Tori-Lattore

On September 27, 2020, the National Gallery of Jamaica’s virtual Last Sundays will feature a musical performance by the singer Tori-Lattore as well as interview clips from the Jamaica Jamaica! exhibition opening. The video will premiere at 1:30pm on both our YouTube and Instagram pages.

Though petite in stature, Tori-Lattore stands tall on the shoulders of her powerful voice. With her smooth velvet tones and fiery delivery, she has mesmerized audiences near and far with her captivating stage presence. Tori started singing with the international performing arts company ASHE at a young age, and now hones her vocal craft and vibrant performance style at the distinguished Edna Manley College – Jamaica School of Music.

Despite her youth, Tori is becoming more recognized in music circles as a vocal powerhouse. She has provided background vocals both on stage and in recording sessions, for music stalwarts such as: Etana, Wayne Marshall, Chevaughn, Romain Virgo, Babycham, Jesse Royal, Notis Heavy Weight Rockaz and Agent Sasco. Tori is the lead female vocalist for the Ashe Company, where she has done numerous concerts, songs, dances and musical theatre productions. She is a triple-threat artist. With Ashe, she has performed for audiences Amsterdam, Trinidad, New York, South Africa and more. She is also a brilliant songwriter whose music is recorded by various artists. Now, as she branches out on her solo career, her sultry tones can be heard in her single “Goodbye.”

For more educational and entertaining content from the National Gallery of Jamaica subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on:-

Instagram @nationalgalleryofjamaica
-Twitter @natgalleryja
-Facebook at NationalGalleryofJamaica.