Digital: Sheena Rose

Sheena Rose is represented in the Digital exhibition (April 24-July 4, 2016). Here is a short feature on her work.

Bio

Sheena Rose was born in 1985 in Barbados. She is currently completing her MFA at the University on Northern Carolina at Greensboro, where she is the recipient of a Fulbright scholarship, and holds a BFA from the Barbados Community College. Rose has exhibited widely, including at Alice Yard in Trinidad; Real Art Ways, Hartford, Connecticut; the Queens Museum, New York; the Havana Biennial; the Art Museum of the Americas, Washington, DC, Greatmore Art Studios, Cape Town; the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Puerto Rico; the 2014 Jamaica Biennial at the National Gallery of Jamaica, the Aruba Biennial; and the Panama Biennial del Sur. Her work has been featured on the book covers of See Me Here, which was published by Robert & Christopher Publishers in Trinidad, and the novel The Star Side of Bird Hill by Naomi Jackson. She is the founder of an art group called Projects and Space, which organized public art projects.

 About the Work

“My art practice questions and shares my personal experiences of being a black Caribbean woman from Barbados. I examine everyday situations, pop culture, stereotypes, history, and urban spaces in my work. I work in many different media such as drawing, animation, paintings, performance, video and photography.”

“My artwork is influenced by my studies in the United States, and travels to South Africa, Suriname, North America, Belgium, and the Caribbean. I incorporate urban street life and overheard conversations into my art work. In my animated drawings, I fuse various places I’ve visited and show my experiences and interpretation of these countries.”

“One of the primary questions in my work is what is the pop culture of Barbados? My answer is a body of work called Sweet Gossip which includes paintings, live performances and photography, and was shown on social networking sites where gossip is typically shared.Social media is a powerful space for the dissemination of my work and transformation of my work through dialogue with the public. I was interested in the idea of private experiences shared publicly and so I created fifteen-second videos of soap operas on Instagram. The soap opera characters addressed various issues facing women, such as women’s positions in the society, expectations in relationships between men and women, and the life of an overthinking artist.”

 

Advertisements

Jamaica Biennial 2014 to Close on March 15 with Artists’ Talks

Artist Talk (Web)

The Jamaica Biennial 2014 is scheduled to close on Sunday, March 15, and to mark the occasion the National Gallery of Jamaica will exceptionally be open from 11 am to 4 pm on that day. A special programme of Artists’ Talks will be presented on that day, starting at 1:30 pm. Admission to the National Gallery of Jamaica and the Artists’ Talks will be free but contributions to our donations box are much appreciated and help to fund exhibitions and programmes such as the Biennial and our Sunday programming.

The Jamaica Biennial 2014 has been a landmark exhibition in several respects and has received significant critical acclaim, in the media and from visitors. Rebranded from what used to be the National Biennial, the Jamaica Biennial 2014 was re-conceptualized to have a more international outlook and to engage local and international audiences more effectively. It is the first Biennial to be judged by international curators – Sara Hermann from the Dominican Republic and Diana Nawi from the Perez Art museum in Miami. It is also the first to include non-Jamaican artists, Blue Curry (Bahamas), James Cooper (Bermuda), Gilles Elie-dit-Cosaque (Martinique), Sheena Rose (Barbados), Richard Mark Rawlins (Trinidad), who were invited to participate in the Special Projects section of the exhibition, along with the Jamaican-born Renee Cox. In another first, the Biennial is shown at more than one location: in addition to the main exhibition at the National Gallery itself, this includes Devon House, which features work by Greg Bailey, James Cooper, Laura Facey, Ebony G. Patterson, Oneika Russell, and Cosmo Whyte, and National Gallery West in Montego Bay, which features work from the Sacred Geometry series by Renee Cox. One special project, PARADISE.jpg by Blue Curry, consists of an intervention on the facades of several buildings in Downtown Kingston. Sunday, March 15, represents the last opportunity to see the Jamaica Biennial 2014 in its entirety.

The Jamaica Biennial 2014 is one of the largest exhibitions in the National Gallery’s history and it is arguably its most diverse exhibition to date. This diversity is reflected in the artists who have been invited to participate in the Artists’ Talks, which are divided into two panels. Panel 1, which is presented under the theme “Traditional Media/New Approaches,” explores how artists use traditional media and styles such as representational painting, ceramics and fibre art to produce work that has significant cultural and aesthetic currency in the present moment. This panel features Michael Layne, Tina Spiro, Katrina Coombs, and Samere Tansley and will be chaired by National Gallery Senior Curator O’Neil Lawrence. Panel 2, titled “Mapping the Social Terrain,” explores how artists engage with the social environment and the social and political issues of the 21st century in new, experimental media. This second panel features Sheena Rose, who is visiting Jamaica for the occasion, as well as Camille Chedda, Katherine Silvera-Sunley and Leasho Johnson and will be chaired by Executive Director Veerle Poupeye. Each artist will make a short presentation on their work in the Biennial and its context, followed by an open discussion at the end of each panel. Continue reading

Jamaica Biennial 2014 – Bulletin # 3: Sheena Rose, James Cooper

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

As we wrote in earlier posts, a special and new feature of the Jamaica Biennial 2014 is that we invited six international artists to participate with special projects. Here is our second post on the subject, on Sheena Rose (Barbados) and James Cooper (Bermuda).

Sheena Rose was born in 1985 in Barbados. She has a BFA from the Barbados Community College and she was recently awarded the Fulbright Scholarship to pursue her MFA in Studio Art at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Rose’s work comprises hand drawn animation, combined with photographs, mixed media, transfers and comic strips. The animations have a surreal quality and deal with the daily life, space and stereotypes of her country.

Rose’s work has been exhibited widely, including at Alice Yard, Port of Spain, Trinidad; Real Art Ways, Hartford Connecticut; the Queens Museum, New York; the Havana Biennial; the Art Museum of the Americas, Washington, D.C, Greatmore Art Studios, Cape Town; Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Puerto Rico; the Aruba Biennial; and the Panama Biennial del Sur. Rose’s work is also featured on two book covers: of See Me Here, which was published by Robert & Christopher Publishers in Trinidad, and Small Axe. She is the founder of an art group called Projects and Space, which organized public art projects.

Rose has the following to say about her work: “My work entails drawing and hand drawn animations but I explore my concept using with different media such as performance, installation, painting to also help portray my ideas. My work is about sharing my experiences of living in the Caribbean, daily situations, urban spaces, youth and popular culture as well about challenging stereotypes. As a young artist from the Caribbean, my travels have allowed me to see what is familiar and unfamiliar in various locations. My animated drawings fuse various places I visit and experiences I have encountered such as Cape Town, Cuba, Martinique and many more. Sometimes I experience culture shock from the travels and it influences my work greatly. I share my feelings and experiences of these cultures, urban street life and overheard conversations by integrating these into my work.”

James Cooper, born in 1965, lives in Bermuda with his wife and two children. He studied Landscape Architecture at the University of British Columbia.  His work has been shown and collected internationally, and his photographs published in numerous magazines and books. Recent exhibitions of his work were held at at Alice Yard in Trinidad and at the Ghetto Biennale in Haiti and his work appeared on the cover of Pictures from Paradise, a survey of contemporary Caribbean photography  published by Robert & Christopher Publishers in Trinidad. Cooper’s work is photography-based and incorporates elements of sculpture; performance and collage that bring to light explorations of relationships to the physical environment and our relationship to art itself.

Continue reading