Last Sundays October 27, 2019 to ft. MINORI

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The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programming for September 29th will feature a performance by MINORI and the inaugural NGJ Summer Exhibition 2019 will also be on view. This month’s staging is in association with the Institute of Jamaica’s Heritage Fest celebrations.

 

 

 

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The NGJ Summer Exhibition 2019 consists of artwork from juried and invited artists from Jamaica and the diaspora to provide an inclusive and diverse showing of contemporary Jamaican art. The exhibition explores a wide variety of themes and concepts and displays a multitude of mediums in which they take form. It is also host to a number of emerging artists that we can look forward to seeing more work from in the future.

 

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She strives to be all that she dreams‘ is the mantra of the Jamaican singer, MINORI. MINORI’s music possesses a deep power & soul, her fusion of Reggae, Hip Hop, Trip Hop, RNB and Dancehall, delivering a message of trial and triumph. Her latest single RED PILL was released early this month, the inspiration of which came from the monumental movie The Matrix, where the RED PILL represents exposure to truth beneath the lies & illusion that surrounds us.

Doors will open to the public from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm. The performance by MINORI will begin at 1:30 p.m. As is customary on Last Sundays, admission and guided tours are free, but contributions to the Donations Box located in the Coffee Shop are appreciated. These donations help to fund our Last Sundays events. The National Gallery’s Gift Shop and Coffee Shop will also be open for business.

Last Sundays September 29, 2019 to ft. QUILT

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The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programming for September 29th will feature a performance by QUILT. The inaugural NGJ Summer Exhibition 2019 will also be on view.

The NGJ Summer Exhibition 2019 consists of artwork from juried and invited artists from Jamaica and the diaspora to provide an inclusive and diverse showing of contemporary Jamaican art. The exhibition explores a wide variety of themes and concepts and displays a multitude of mediums in which they take form. It is also host to a number of emerging artists that we can look forward to seeing more work from in the future.

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Founded by Rayon McLean, QUILT is a dynamic group of young creative artists exploring and sharing transformative theatre. An avenue for young creative artists & performers, by young creative artists & performers, QUILT was born out of a need for a fresh, new, innovative way of creating performance art- a need to do things differently. QUILT’s mission is to transform theatre. Using devised theatre as their main tool of expression and under the leadership of the 2010 Prime Minister Youth Awardee for Excellence in Arts and Culture, Mr. Rayon McLean, the group’s main focus is to provide pieces that come with a strong social message that forces you to think and reflect, feel, laugh, learn and see our way of telling stories.

Doors will open to the public from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm. The performance by QUILT will begin at 1:30 p.m. As is customary on Last Sundays, admission and guided tours are free, but contributions to the Donations Box located in the Coffee Shop are appreciated. These donations help to fund our Last Sundays events. The National Gallery’s Gift Shop and Coffee Shop will also be open for business.

Last Sundays August 25, 2019 to feature Ziah Push

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The National Gallery of Jamaica’s programming for Last Sundays on August 25, 2019 will feature the recently opened National Gallery of Jamaica Summer Exhibition 2019 as well as a performance by the musical artiste Ziah Push.

The NGJ Summer Exhibition is one comprised of both juried and invited artists from Jamaica and the diaspora to provide an inclusive and diverse showing of Jamaican art. The exhibition is varied in the concepts and themes explored by the artists as well as the mediums in which they take form. It is also host to a number of emerging artists that we can look forward to seeing more work from in the future.

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Growing up in Manchester, Jamaica, Ziah had a dream in his head and a passion in his heart, and that was to be a great artiste. Music has always been his biggest curiosity. Playing multiple instruments (guitar, bass, violin and piano) allowed him to perfect his craft as a producer, working closely with legendary producer “Don Corleonie” with credits from names such as Shaggy, Nicki Minaj, Sean Paul, Protoje and Chronixx.

Ziah’s Journey has led him to take the forefront as a recording artiste because he “has something to say”. His most recent Single is entitled “Black Magic Woman” produced  by his “Face The Music” Label and released under Protoje’s “Indigg Collective” Label.

The National Gallery of Jamaica will be open from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm. The performance will begin at 1:30 pm. As per usual on Last Sundays, admission is free, but contributions to our Donations Box, located in the lobby, are appreciated. These donations help to fund our in house exhibitions and our Last Sundays programming. The National Gallery’s Gift Shop and Coffee Shop will be open for business.

Last Sundays: The 25th Art of Reggae Exhibition Reception

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The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programming for March 31, 2019 will feature the Pimento Band as well as the winner and top 100 entries for the International Reggae Poster Contest (IRPC) in The 25th Art of Reggae Exhibition. There will also be a speech by IRPC founder Maria Papaefstathiou and IRPC board member Carolyn Cooper.

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The 25th Art of Reggae Exhibition is hosted by the IRPC, which was founded in 2011 by Michael Thompson (1958-2016) and Maria Papaefstathiou. The contest aims to highlight positive Reggae music and the impact it has had around the globe. The long term goal is to create a Kingston based Reggae Hall of Fame museum and performance centre that wil facilitate and celebrate Reggae. In addition to that IRPC aims gain support for the Alpha Boys School, an vocational institution located in Kingston. It was founded in 1880 by the Sisters of Mercy. It is geared towards underprivileged youth and has been home to many notable Reggae artists such as Yellowman and Desmond Dekker.

Maria Papaefstathiou (Image courtesy of her website https://www.itsjustme.net/

Born in Athens, Greece, Maria Papaefstathiou is a graphic designer who has been practicing since 1996. Her main focus and research is in poster design. She is the founder and editor of the blog Graphic Art News where she selects high quality international works including designs, illustrations and art to teach and inspire other designers. Graphic Art News has been known to be used an educational tool to many.

Carolyn-Cooper

A Jamaican author and scholar, Prof. Carolyn Cooper is a consultant on culture and development. A woman of many accolades, Cooper received a scholarship to complete her B.A in English at UWI, Mona and fellowships to complete bother M.A and PhD at the University of Toronto. She has authored the books Sound Clash: Jamaican Dancehall Culture at Large (2004) and Noises in the Blood: Orality, Gender and the ‘Vulgar’ Body of Jamaican Popular Culture (1993). She also initiated the International Reggae Studies Centre at UWI.

The reception will feature a special musical performance by the Pimento Band. The band, though only a little over a year old, features musicians with over thirty years of experience in the local and international music scenes. The roster includes Leebert “Gibby” Morrison, bass player on Peter Tosh’s album’s Mama Africa and the Grammy award winning No Nuclear War, Orlando “Lando” Bolt of the Live Wyya Band, and past student of Alpha Boys Everol “Stingwray” Wray who has been featured on the album The Miseducation of Lauren Hill. The bands repertoire ranges from Ska to Reggae to a style they have dubbed progressive Mento.

The National Gallery of Jamaica will be open from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm, with the Pimento Band’s performance beginning at 1:30 p.m. As per usual on Last Sundays, admission is free, but contributions to our Donations Box, located in the lobby, are appreciated. These donations help to fund our in house exhibitions and our Last Sundays programming. The National Gallery’s Gift Shop and Coffee Shop will be open for business.

Last Sundays July 29, 2018 to feature the Rhumbaka Mento Band

The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programming for July 29th will feature a musical performance by the Rhumbaka Mento Band. Visitors will have a last chance to view the exhibitions John Dunkley: Neither Day nor Night and Daylight Come: Picturing Dunkley’s Jamaica.

Mento music originates from Jamaica’s plantation days and comprises of both African and European influences, sharing similarities to Trinidadian calypso. It predates genres such as ska and reggae and was the first form of popular Jamaican music to be recorded commercially. The instruments commonly used in mento are unique: the banjo, fife, maraca and the rumba box, from which “Rhumbaka” takes part of its name.

The Rhumbaka Mento Band

ABOUT THE PERFORMERS

St. Catherine’s “Rhumbakah”, the modern day mento band, is very idiosyncratic. Emerging from Charlemont High School, it consists of talented young men aiming to spread mento music through the band’s unique sound and look. The band, which was founded in 2017,  is directed and managed by Nigel Powell.

To date the Rhumbaka Mento Band has performed at the University of the West Indies Vice Chancellor’s Christmas Dinner, the Ministry of Education’s GSAT awards, the JCDC Customer Appreciation Awards Ceremony and the Nestle CEO reception and other other events.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITIONS

John Dunkley: Neither Day nor Night was originally exhibited at the Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM). It was curated by Diana Nawi and co-curated by independent Jamaican curator Nicole Smythe-Johnson. The exhibition focuses on intuitive Jamaican artist John Dunkley (1891-1947) who is known for his darkly coloured paintings, rich with fantastical landscapes.

Alongside the John Dunkley exhibition is Daylight Come: Picturing Dunkley’s Jamaica, which explores the events in Jamaica during Dunkley’s time. Daylight Come… looks at the works of Dunkley’s contemporaries, Albert Huie, Henry Daley, David Miller Snr and Jnr, amongst others and the transitory shift into the Jamaican Nationalist era.

Both exhibitions close on this Last Sundays, July 29, 2018.

Doors will open to the public from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm. The performance by the Rhumbakah Mento Band will begin at 1:30 p.m. As is customary on Last Sundays, admission and guided tours are free, but contributions to the Donations Box located in the Coffee Shop are appreciated. These donations help to fund our Last Sunday’s events. The National Gallery’s Gift Shop and Coffee Shop will also be open for business.

“Daylight Come…Picturing Dunkley’s Jamaica” to open at National Gallery’s on Last Sundays on May 27, 2018

The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programme for the month of May will mark the opening of a new exhibition Daylight Come…Picturing Dunkley’s Jamaica. It will also feature a special ensemble musical performance as part of Lupus Awareness month activities.

Daylight Come…Picturing Dunkley’s Jamaica complements the John Dunkley: Neither Day nor Night exhibition which opened on April 29.This retrospective of Dunkley’s work was curated by independent curator Diana Nawi, formerly of the Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM), and Nicole Smythe-Johnson, independent Jamaican curator and writer. Originally shown at PAMM in 2017, this version includes six works that were not part of that initial exhibition.

John Dunkley – Diamond Wedding (1940), Collection: National Gallery of Jamaica (Gift of Cassie Dunkley)

This new exhibition Daylight Come… explores themes such as tourism, immigration and the emergence of cultural nationalism in Jamaica during Dunkley’s lifetime. The exhibition provides further context to Dunkley’s creative output; exploring the works of his contemporaries David Miller Snr and David Miller Jnr, Carl Abrahams, Albert Huie, David Pottinger, Ralph Campbell and Henry Daley among others. This exhibition will be on view until July 29, 2018.

The Millers in 1964

May is Lupus Awareness Month and the special musical performance this Last Sundays serves as one of the activities to raise awareness to this life-altering disease. The music, poetry and dance that will be performed are all inspired by the emotional states experienced by someone with Lupus. The various performers include members of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Jamaica, the Jamaica Youth Chorale, the Porter Centre for Knowledge and The Music House.

Edna Manley – Prayer/Kneeling Figure, (1937)

As is now customary for our Sunday programmes, the doors will be open to the public from 11 am to 4 pm and the special musical performance starts at 1:30 pm. Admission and guided tours will be free. The gift and coffee shop will also be open for business.