Last Sundays to Screen the Film “Inna De Yard” + Live Discussion w/ Peter Webber

At 1:30 pm on November 29, 2020 the National Gallery of Jamaica in association with the Jamaica Film and Television Association (JAFTA) will feature an online screening of the film “Inna De Yard” followed by a discussion with the film’s director Peter Webber for its virtual Last Sundays.

Kiddus I, The Rebel (Image courtesy of Charades)

More than 30 years after their golden age, a band of singers gather up for the recording of a new album before embarking on a World Tour. Voices of Reggae like Ken Boothe, Winston McAnuff, Kiddus I, Judy Mowatt, and Cedric Myron, the famous lead of the Congos, are but a few in this film. These artistes have known each other for years and the have contributed greatly to the development of reggae: they’ve sung with the greats and rubbed shoulders with Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Jimmy Cliff. For the project “Inna de Yard”, they’ve reunited to revisit the biggest tracks of their repertoire and record a unique acoustic album, returning to the sources of their music. On this occasion, they’ll share the microphone with younger singers, representatives of the new reggae stage uniting their energy in a collective, powerful vibration.

Jah 9 (Image courtesy of Charades)

In this film the director, Peter Webber, takes us along for the recording of the album, which will be the soundtrack, as well as the everyday life of the singers for several weeks. His aim is to get to grips with reggae, and at the same time witness the intimate lives of some of the legendary personalities that helped to create it. Built around a series of portraits, and giving star billing to the reggae music that will permeate it from beginning to end, the film invites us on a visceral and musical voyage to discover reggae and some of the fascinating people who create and perform it every day.

Growing up in West London in the 1970’s, Peter Webber was surrounded by reggae music. There was a large and well-established Jamaican community and the Notting Hill Carnival, the capital’s biggest street party, throbbed to the sounds of it. He was a fan of The Clash, who often promoted reggae music and that impacted him deeply. His record collection was soon filled with reggae albums and he sought out iconic reggae films such as “The Harder They Come” and “Rockers.” Webber eventually visited Jamaica and saw the opportunity for stories to be told through the intersection of the old and new generations of reggae.

To view the film and discussion please click the following link:

http://cet-it.com/live/ngj-inna-de-yard-the-soul-of-jamaica-screening-discussion/

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Virtual Last Sundays ft. Children of Babylon

Last Sundays Flyer

This July 26, 2020, the National Gallery of Jamaica will once again be hosting its virtual Last Sundays programme on our YouTube channel. We will be screening Children of Babylon which will be released online at 1:30pm, followed by a live Q&A on YouTube discussion at 3:45pm with production team member Cheryl Ryman.

Reggae Artist Bob Andy
Reggae Artist Bob Andy

A Jamaican made film, Children of Babylon is about life, love and tragedy. It explores Jamaica as a metaphorical Babylon that has more to it than the standard global perceptions of the Rastaman, Rum, Reggae and Ganja. The story follows a cast of characters from various racial and socio-economic backgrounds.

“The vortex is Penny, a young university graduate student; Rick – an artist; Luke – a “dreadlocks” farmhand; Dorcas – the housekeeper and Laura – the wealthy American owner of the plantation and greathouse, which silently represents the proverbial “house divided against itself”.

(l) Cinematographer: Franklyn "Chappie" St. Juste, (c) Richard Lannaman, (r) Director: Lennie Little-White
(l) Cinematographer: Franklyn “Chappie” St. Juste, (c) Richard Lannaman, (r) Director: Lennie Little-White

The film was directed by Lennie Little-White, with Franklyn “Chappie” St. Juste as the cinematographer. Among the cast are the recently deceased reggae artist Bob Andy as well as Tobi Phillips, Don Parchment, Leonie Forbes and Elizabeth De Lisser.

Parental Advisory: This film contains explicit themes considered inappropriate for viewers under the age of 17.

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Introducing First Saturdays: Hard Road to Travel

First Saturdays Flyer

Beginning in March 2020, the National Gallery of Jamaica (NGJ) will be hosting a film series entitled First Saturdays, which will be held on the first Saturdays of March, April, May and June of this year. This film series has been initiated as a part of the public programming associated with the Jamaica Jamaica! exhibition, which opened to the public on February 2, 2020 and is scheduled to close on June 28, 2020.  

The NGJ will commence the film series on Saturday March 7, 2020 with the documentary film Hard Road To Travel: The Making of the Harder They Come, by Jamaican film-maker Chris Browne. Hard Road To Travel explores the two-year journey undertaken by Jamaican film-maker Perry Henzell to film and release the iconic 1972 film The Harder They Come, for which Henzell was both director and co- writer alongside Trevor Rhone. The documentary highlights the struggles of Jamaica’s early film industry, while simultaneously providing a lens through which a period of Jamaican music can be explored and interpreted. Chris Browne’s own filmography includes another outstanding Jamaican feature film, Third World Cop (1999), as well as his more recent Ghett’a Life (2011). 

The film screening of Hard Road To Travel: The Making of the Harder They Come is scheduled to commence at 1:30pm. Attendance to the event is free of cost and is open to the public. Visitors are also being encouraged to view the Jamaica Jamaica! exhibition prior to the beginning of the film. For further details, contact the National Gallery of Jamaica at (876) 618-0654, (876) 922-1561 or (876) 922-1563.

Last Sundays November 24, 2019 to ft. 6 Films

JAFTA_Flyer

The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programming for November 24th will feature a film screening in association with Jamaica Film and Television Association (JAFTA).

Film Screening_Flight.png

Flight directed by Kia Moses and Adrian McDonald and produced by Tashera Lee Johnson

As usual Last Sundays admission is free though we are inviting donations for the Bahamas Hurricane Relief in light of the severe damage that was done to parts of the archipelago during hurricane Dorian. JAFTA is a non-profit association that represents the interests of the Film & TV industry of Jamaica inclusive of marketing Jamaican productions on the international scene.

We will be screening the following 6 films:

  • Passage directed and produced by Kareem Mortimer
  • Code directed by Sarah Manley and produced by Darin Tennent
  • Origins directed by Kurt Wright and produced by Noelle Kerr
  • A Broken Appointment directed and produced by Kaleb D’Aguilar
  • Trust directed by Jason Evans and produced by Renée Cesar
  • Flight directed by Kia Moses and Adrian McDonald and produced by Tashera Lee Johnson

Doors will open to the public from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm. The screening will begin at 1:30 p.m. As is customary on Last Sundays, guided tours are free, but contributions to the Donations Box located in the Coffee Shop are appreciated. These donations help to fund our Last Sundays events. The National Gallery’s Gift Shop and Coffee Shop will also be open for business.

21st CENTURY KAPO – SATURDAY FEBRUARY 17, 2018

As part of our programming for Black History Month, the National Gallery of Jamaica (NGJ) will be hosting a special event on Saturday February 17, 2018, at 1:30 pm entitled 21ST Century Kapo. Mallica “Kapo” Reynolds is considered to be Jamaica’s foremost Intuitive artists; and the newly reinstalled gallery features a selection of sculptures and paintings from the Larry Wirth Collection, the John Pringle Collection and the Aaron and the Marjorie Matalon Collection. The works in these galleries showcase the broad subject matter and iconography that Kapo explored and highlight the cultural significance of this artist.

The Kapo Gallery – which is one of only two NGJ galleries that are dedicated to single artists – was reopened on January 28 after being closed for almost a year; 21st Century Kapo will give the public an opportunity to learn more about this artist and engage in a discussion of his legacy and relevance to Jamaicans today.

21ST Century Kapo will feature a special screening of the archival film, Kapo the Artist, which first aired on BBC TWO in 1986. In it Kapo speaks about his life and work as an artist and Revivalist leader, it features commentary by Dr. David Boxer, Professor Rex Nettleford and Ambassador Dudley Thompson among others. The screening will be followed by a short, candid discussion between Dr. Clinton Hutton, Professor of Caribbean Political Philosophy, Culture and Aesthetics (University of the West Indies, Mona) and NGJ Senior Curator, O’Neil Lawrence.

Attendance to 21ST Century Kapo is free of cost and is open to the public. Visitors are being encouraged to view the newly reinstalled galleries prior to the beginning of the discussion.