Jamaica Biennial 2017 – Juried Artists: Di-Andre Caprice Davis

Di-Andre Caprice Davis – put_togeher.gifS (1) (2017) (detail)

Another feature from the Jamaica Biennial 2017 archives.

Di-Andre Caprice Davis was born in Kingston, Jamaica, and is a self-described experimental artist. In 2016, she completed an artist’s residency at Bluecoat, a contemporary arts centre in Liverpool, England. Her work has been featured in a number of art shows including Jamaica Biennial 2014, Young Talent 2015, Digital (2016) and Kingston, Part 1: The City and Art (2016) at the National Gallery of Jamaica. Additionally, it was featured in Jamaican Pulse: Art and Politics from Jamaica and the Diaspora, which was held in 2016 at the Royal West of England Academy in Bristol, United Kingdom. Davis has been inspired by the relationship between mathematics, science and technology, and how these can be manipulated to inform how the human brain perceives, processes and interprets visual imagery. She is based in Kingston.

Di-Andre Caprice Davis – put_togeher.gifS (1) (2017)

 

Tumblr: diandrecapricedavis.tumblr.com

Digital: Di-Andre Caprice Davis

Di-Andre Caprice Davis - Chaotic Beauty (2016, still from GIF animation)

Di-Andre Caprice – Chaotic Beauty – still 1 (medres)

Another feature on one of the artists in Digital, which opens on Sunday, April 24:

Bio

Di-Andre Caprice Davis was born in Kingston, Jamaica. She is a self-described “intuitive experimental artist” exploring new media technologies. Notable exhibitions include the National Gallery of Jamaica’s Jamaica Biennial 2014 as well as Trajectories (2014), which was hosted by multi-national law firm, Myers Fletcher and Gordon. She also participated in the exhibition Canopy Guild which was organized by New Local Space (NLS) also in the same year. Most recently, she was a selected exhibitor in the NGJ’s Young Talent 2015 exhibition. She lives and works in Kingston.

Davis, Di-Andre Caprice - Chaotic Beauty - still 2 (medres)

Di-Andre Caprice Davis – Chaotic Beauty (2016, still from GIF animation)

About the Work

“My current explorations seek to compare and contrast the ways in which the human brain perceives, processes and interprets visual imagery gathered from everyday experiences, with imagery that is generated solely through the use of digital technology, for example, images created through video-editing application and computer graphics software.”

“By gathering raw footage of objects, environments and people, then editing this footage to include psychedelic colours and movements juxtaposed within, it is hoped that the viewer will reconsider the degree to which visual perception can border between the natural and the synthetic.”

Young Talent 2015: Di-Andre Caprice Davis

Diandre Davis

Di-Andre Caprice Davis – Overly Utopian Dreams (2007-2015)

We publish another of our short posts on the artists in the Young Talent 2015 exhibition, which opens on August 30:

Di-Andre Caprice Davis was born in 1986, Kingston, Jamaica. She is a self-described visual artist who is experimenting with new media technologies. She works and lives in Kingston.

Artist’s Statement

In my work, I combined a passion for digital aesthetic with furthering the exposure and understanding of how technology has affected our world. Although the images are highly personal representations of my dreams, they are abstract enough and open enough to allow individual interpretation. I have used animation techniques to show the power of artistic image manipulation; turning still images into hypnotic GIF art. I prefer to collage and compose several looping actions emphasizing the motions that mimic bodily rhythm. It is like an adventure in a second life exploring its outer limits with digital imaging tools.

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Young Talent 2015 to Open on August 30

Youn Talent Invitation (update)-01

The National Gallery of Jamaica is pleased to present Young Talent 2015, an exhibition which features ten artists living in and from Jamaica and under forty years old, namely: Greg Bailey, Alicia Brown, Katrina Coombs, Di-Andre Caprice Davis, Monique Gilpin, Domanie Hong, Howard Myrie, Richard Nattoo, Avagay Osborne, and Cosmo Whyte. The exhibition will open on Sunday, August 30, 2015 and will be on view at the National Gallery until November 14, 2015.

The first Young Talent exhibition was held in 1985, as part of JAMFEST 85, when Jamaica hosted the International Youth Conference. Young Talent 85 featured eleven young artists, including Basil Watson, Omari Ra, Khalfani Ra, and Petrine Archer-Straw. As part of the National Gallery’s strategies to uncover and support new developments of Jamaican art, Young Talent exhibitions have been organized intermittently since then, in 1989, 1995, 2002, and most recently in 2010, and many well-known contemporary Jamaican artists had their first major exhibition as part of the Young Talent series. Young Talent V in 2010 was particularly ground-breaking and launched a new generation of artists who have since revolutionized the Jamaican art landscape, such as Ebony G. Patterson, Phillip Thomas, Leasho Johnson and Oneika Russell. The National Gallery has also staged the New Roots exhibition in 2013, which was treated as a spin-off from the Young Talent series and featured artists such as Matthew McCarthy, Olivia McGilchrist, Camille Chedda, and Deborah Anzinger.

To support what is presently an exceptionally energetic and innovative contemporary art scene in Jamaica, the National Gallery now intends to present Young Talent exhibitions every two years, in the years alternating with the Jamaica Biennial. For the present exhibition, Young Talent 2015, the National Gallery opened the selection process with a call for submissions and entries were received from thirty-five artists, from which ten were selected. While most of the selected artists already have an exhibition record, Howard Myrie, Avagay Osborne, and Domanie Hong have just graduated from the Edna Manley College, which continues to be the main engine for development and innovation in Jamaican art.

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Young Talent 2015 includes a healthy range of artistic media and practices, including new and more traditional media, including GIF collages, fibre-based work and representational painting, which coexist productively as part of Jamaica’s emerging contemporary art language. While some of it is also deeply personal, most of the work selected for Young Talent 2015 is explicitly or implicitly political—tackling challenging subjects such as gender violence, social dysfunction, power and marginalization, the politics of the body, and displacement and forced migration—and reflects the complex and unsettling cultural and political events and debates that shape the “post-postcolonial” world. One striking feature of the exhibition is the artists’ engagement with the materiality of their work, which is mined judiciously for its visual poetry and political implications. The result is a compelling and though-provoking exhibition, which should produce healthy debate about current artistic and cultural trends and about the broader social and political questions raised.

The August 30 opening function of Young Talent 2015 is presented as part of the National Gallery’s Last Sundays programme, with doors open from 11 am to 4 pm and the opening function at 1:30 pm. There will be no guest speaker and instead we will be screening a short video documentary on the participating artists. This will be followed by a musical performance by Jah9. As is customary, the event is free and open to the public but donations are welcomed, as these play an important role in funding projects such as Last Sundays and exhibitions such as Young Talent 2015.

Ten Artists Selected for Young Talent 2015

Diandre Davis

Di-Andre Caprice Davis – gif colllage

The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Young Talent exhibition series was introduced in 1985 and has seen five editions thus far, the last of which – Young Talent V – was held in 2010. The purpose of this exhibition series is to provide exposure to the work of artists under forty years old, in and from Jamaica, and the series supports an important aspect of the NGJ’s mandate, which is to actively encourage new developments in Jamaican art and to support the work of young and emerging artists. The series also encourages public critical dialogue about new directions in Jamaican art and culture and provides a platform for innovative curatorial practice. Several well-known Jamaican artists are alumni of the series, including Omari Ra, Basil Watson, Anna Henriques, Khalfani Ra, Paul Stoppi, Ebony G. Patterson, Phillip Thomas, Leasho Johnson, Oneika Russell, Marvin Bartley, Michael Elliott, and Marlon James. A related exhibition – New Roots – was held in 2013 and featured artists such as Matthew McCarthy, Camille Chedda, Storm Saulter, Varun Baker, and Deborah Anzinger.

Richard Nattoo - Oblivion (2015)

Richard Nattoo – Oblivion (2015)

Another exhibition in the Young Talent series is scheduled open on August 30, 2015 and will feature ten artists under forty, namely Greg Bailey, Alicia Brown, Katrina Coombs, Di-Andre Caprice Davis, Domanie Denniston, Monique Gilpin, Howard Myrie, Richard Nattoo, Avagaye Osborne, and Cosmo Whyte. The selection process for Young Talent 2015 was based on a call for submissions and a total of thirty-five entries were received. While the original intent was to feature only eight artists, the curatorial team decided to increase this number to ten, in response to the quality and range of entries. The selections were made by Executive Director Veerle Poupeye, Senior Curator O’Neil Lawrence and Assistant Curators Monique Barnett-Davidson and Tesha Chai, who will also serve as the curatorial team for this exhibition.

Greg Bailey - No Blue Skies in the Land of Sunshine (2013)

Greg Bailey – No Blue Skies in the Land of Sunshine (2013)

Young Talent 2015 covers a healthy range of contemporary art practices, from the realist portrait paintings of Greg Bailey and Alicia Brown to the textile- and fibre-based works of Katrina Coombs and Avagaye Osborne. The focus on textile- and fibre-based media is a relatively new development in local contemporary art and is part of a broader trend of experimentation with media, which is also evident in the glass-based work of Howard Myrie, Richard Nattoo and Domanie Denniston. As in Young Talent V and New Roots, there is a strong representation of photography-based media, as can be seen in the work of Domanie Denniston, Di-andre Caprice Davis, Monique Gilpin and Cosmo Whyte, although the latter now also produces three-dimensional constructions. While there is no deliberate common theme in the exhibition, the works selected are perhaps best understood as a mirror of the contemporary world, in Jamaica and globally and address issues such as the politics of gender, sexuality and race and, in several instances, use subtle formal and verbal strategies to make powerful statements that all lives matter.

In all, Young Talent 2015 promises to be a strong, engaging and at times provocative exhibition and a worthy successor to Young Talent V and New Roots.

Cosmo Whyte - You Know We Can't Swim

Cosmo Whyte – You Know We Can’t Swim