Last Sundays, April 30, 2017 – feat. Shashame and the Jamaica Biennial 2017

The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programme for April 30, 2017 will feature the Jamaica Biennial 2017 exhibition and a screening of the film documentary, Shashamane, On the Trail of The Promised Land.

The film explores the narratives of a number of settlers of African-descent from across the world, who have been living in Shashamane – a 200-hectare plot of land in Ethiopia, located 250 km south of Addis Ababa. The land was donated to all blacks in the world by the Emperor of Ethiopia Hailé Selassie in 1950. Ras Mweya Masimba is one of the key characters in the film, he moved to Shashamane in 1990. He is an English-born artist of Jamaican origins who depicts the deeds of his people in his animated films. Today African descendants from around the world — France, Jamaica, the United States, the United Kingdom, and various Caribbean islands – live in Shashamane. All of them were motivated by the desire for self-affirmation, after centuries of humiliation, and a longing to bring up their children in a nurturing context devoid of racism, making of tangible reality of the famous “Exodus” sung by Bob Marley.

The director of Shashamane, On the Trail of The Promised Land, Guilia Amati is an Italian-French filmmaker. She has directed several ads and commercials for corporations, NGOs and International organizations such as the FAO and Caritas International. In 2010 she co-directed, with Stephen Natanson, the feature-length documentary This Is My Land…Hebron, which won more than twenty awards, including the Aljazeera International Documentary Film Festival, the Festival International du Film des Droits de l’Homme de Paris, the Buenos Aires Human Rights Film Festival, and the Italian foreign press association’s Golden Globe Prize. The film also earned a special mention at the Nastri D’Argento, where it was a finalist for the David di Donatello Award and was selected by the Human Rights Watch Film Festival for their festivals in London, New York and Chicago. Shashamane is Amati’s second feature-length film.

Visitors will also be able to view the critically acclaimed Jamaica Biennial 2017 exhibition, which opened with a series of events from February 24 to 26 and continues until May 28 at three locations, the National Gallery of Jamaica itself, Devon House in New Kingston and National Gallery West in Montego Bay. The exhibition features the work of more than 90 artists in a variety of media and styles, including that of six international invitees – David Gumbs, Andrea Chung, Jodie Lyn-Kee-Chow, Raquel Paiewonsky, Marcel Pinas, and Nadia Huggings – and also features two special tributes to noted Jamaican artists — the painter Alexander Cooper and the late photographer and videographer Peter Dean Rickards.

The National Gallery of Jamaica’s doors will be open from 11 am to 4 pm on Sunday, April 30, 2017 and the film will start at 1:30 pm. As is customary for Last Sundays, admission will be free at the National Gallery of Jamaica’s Downtown Kingston location, and there will also be free tours of the exhibition. The Devon House location will also be exceptionally open from 11 am to 4 pm on April 30 and National Gallery West will as usual be open from 9 am to 5 pm. Regular admission rates will apply at both National Gallery West and at Devon House.

 

Last Sundays – March 26, 2016: feat. the Jamaica Biennial 2017 and BLACKasCOLE

The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programme for March 26, 2017, will feature the Jamaica Biennial 2017 and a special musical performance by BLACKasCOLE.

Fronted by songstress Cecile Black, BLACKasCOLE’s performance style is a fusion of different genres: Alternative, Blues, Gospel, R&B, Reggae/Dub-Rock which they have integrated into a base component of Reggae and Dub; the result is a new genre that the band calls Jam-on-Dub. The band emerged from the UWI Pop society at the Mona campus and has been in existence for three years now. Its goal is to “to ignite your hearts with conscious uplifting messages of truth and love.” BLACKasCOLE performs mostly original material and cover versions are usually interpretations of songs with personal significance. The band has graced a number of stages performing several times at the Jamaica Jazz & Blues Festival and venues such as Red Bones Blues Cafe’; Jamnesia; and Plug ‘n’ Play at the Jonkanoo Lounge of the Wyndham Hotel, to name a few. Their last performance at the National Gallery, three years ago, was extremely well received by our audience and we are particularly pleased to welcome back BLACKasCOLE, for what is guaranteed to be a phenomenal Last Sundays appearance.

Visitors will be able to view the critically acclaimed Jamaica Biennial 2017 which opened in late February 2017 at three locations: the National Gallery of Jamaica on the Kingston waterfront, Devon House in New Kingston and National Gallery West in Sam Sharpe Square, Montego Bay. Featuring a diverse mix of locally and overseas based artists, some of them well known and others emerging or new, the 2017 edition of the Jamaica Biennial reflects the vitality of the Jamaican art scene and the complex global dynamics that shape the art of the Caribbean region today. As was first done in 2014, the Jamaica Biennial features six specially invited international artists, from the Caribbean and its Diaspora—Jodie Lyn-Kee-Chow, Raquel Paiewonsky, Marcel Pinas, Nadia Huggins at the National Gallery of Jamaica; Andrea Chung at Devon House; and David Gumbs at National Gallery West—and the exhibition also includes two special tributes to noted Jamaican artists—Alexander Cooper and Peter Dean Rickards, both of which can be viewed at the National Gallery of Jamaica. The exhibition includes work in conventional media and styles as well as more experimental work in digital and other contemporary media, including several mixed media installations. The largest and arguably the most ambitious such exhibition staged to date by the National Gallery, the Jamaica Biennial runs at all three locations until May 28, 2017.

The National Gallery of Jamaica’s doors will be open from 11 am to 4 pm on Sunday, March 26, 2017 and the programme will start at 1:30 pm. As is customary for Last Sundays, admission will be free at the National Gallery of Jamaica’s downtown Kingston location and there will also be free tours of the Jamaica Biennial 2017. The Devon House location will also be exceptionally from 11 am to 4 pm and National Gallery West will be open from 9 am to 5 pm. Regular admission rates will apply at both National Gallery West and at Devon House.

Last Sundays, January 29, 2017, feat. Spiritual Yards and Javada

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The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programme for January 29, 2017, will be the last chance to see the Spiritual Yards Home Ground of Jamaica’s Intuitives Selections from the Wayne and Myrene Cox exhibition, which closes on that day.  There will also be a musical performance by emerging artiste Javada.

Consisting entirely of works from the collection of Wayne and Myrene Cox Collection, the Spiritual Yards exhibition explores the work of Intuitive artists who produced sacred images and objects which are rooted in Revival religions, Rastafari or their individual spiritual beliefs, and are representative of the “spiritual yard” tradition in Jamaica, which is an important yet insufficiently documented part of Jamaica’s popular cultural heritage. Spiritual Yards features the work of ten such artists, namely Errol Lloyd “Powah” Atherton, Vincent Atherton, Everald Brown, Pastor Winston Brown, Leonard Daley, Reginald English, Elijah (Geneva Mais Jarrett), William “Woody” Joseph, Errol McKenzie, and Sylvester Stephens, along with rare photographs and video material on their life, work and spiritual yards from the Wayne and Myrene Cox archives. The exhibition has achieved significant visitor acclaim and is a must-see before it closes.

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Born Nevada Myrie, the deejay, lyricist and performer Javada grew up in East Kingston where he spent much of his time listening to and emulating his favourite deejays Bounty Killa, Shabba Ranks, Terror Fabulous and Buju Banton. Javada is a former member of dancehall star, Konshens’ Subkonshus Music Group label, and has performed on major stages in Europe, Africa, USA, and the Caribbean, as Konshens’ opening act. He has also recorded and released a number of songs with Konshens, most notably, Say Di Word (ZJ Liquid, H2O Records), and Gyal Dem Ready.  His big voice, commanding stage presence, and a warm personality brought this dynamic deejay and songwriter to the attention of Spanish superstar singer, Enrique Iglesias, who featured Javada on the 2016 Billboard charting, ‘Spanglish’ remix of his song, Duele El Corazón (The Heart Aches). Javada’s music in 2016 also reached the international airwaves with the single Wake Up Beside You, on the Cold Heart Riddim (Robert Livingston, Scikron Entertainment) and the song has quickly become a regular choice on radio, club and sound systems playlists in several African countries and in the African Diaspora. Javada’s most recent single, In Deh (Dre Day Productions) is on the same trajectory, receiving regular air and club play within the African Music market and also on local stations.

The National Gallery of Jamaica’s doors will be open from 11 am to 4 pm on Sunday, January 29, 2017 and the musical programme will start at 1:30 pm. As is customary, admission will be free and there will also be free tours of the National Collection, but contributions to the National Gallery’s donations box are always appreciated. The National Gallery gift and coffee shops will be open for business and proceeds from these ventures help to fund programmes such as Last Sundays as well as our exhibitions.

Last Sundays, November 27, 2016 – feat. Jazmyn

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The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programme for November 27, 2016, will feature a special musical performance by emerging artiste Jazmyn.

Multifaceted singer, dancer and artist Jazmyn has been singing on her church’s choir since the tender age of 5, Jazmyn went on to develop her talents at Ardenne High School where she was a member of the music and dance club; and further explored her passion for performing at the University of the West Indies, as a member of the Quilt Performing Arts Company and as a member of the Pop Society and University Dance Society. As an actress, she co-starred alongside No-Maddz in Capture Land, a short film directed by Nabil Elderkin as well as the short film Proscenium which was the winner of the 2015 Jampro Film Festival Best Short Film Audience Award and was nominated for best narrative short film. Her musical style is a mixture of Reggae, Jazz and Soul with Global influences and she will be performing covers as well as previously unheard original compositions. Jazmyn aspires to reach souls through her creative expressions and hopes to expand national and regional appreciation for the arts.

Visitors will also be able to view the Kapo and Edna Manley Galleries, the Historical Galleries, and the A.D. Scott Galleries, A Special Tribute to Barrington Watson as well as a temporary exhibition consisting of selections from the Gallery’s modern Jamaican collection, featuring major works by Albert Huie, Marlon James, Eugene Hyde Everald Brown Colin Garland, Carl Abrahams, David Pottinger, Albert Artwell, Karl Parboosingh, Gloria Escoffery, Rex Dixon, Renee Cox and others.

The National Gallery’s doors will be open from 11 am to 4 pm on Sunday, November 27, 2016 and the programme will start at 1:30 pm. As is customary, admission will be free and there will also be free tours of the National Collection, but contributions to the National Gallery’s donations box are always appreciated. The National Gallery gift and coffee shops will be open for business and proceeds from these ventures help to fund programmes such as Last Sundays as well as our exhibitions.

Last Sundays – October 30, 2016, feat. Tribute to Cecil Cooper Exhibition and Music by Peter Lloyd

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The National Gallery of Jamaica (NGJ) will have special opening hours for its Last Sundays on October 30, 2016. The gallery will exceptionally be open to the public from 1:00 to 5:00 pm on that day and will feature the Cecil Cooper Tribute exhibition and a special musical performance by Peter Lloyd, which will start at 2 pm.

October 30 will be the final day to see the National Gallery’s special tribute exhibition honouring renowned Jamaican painter, singer, art educator and NGJ Board member Cecil Cooper C.D. who passed away on September 15, 2016. This exhibit features work that spans his artistic career, including two works from the National Gallery Collection. Cooper worked mainly in paint media, using gestural painting and drawing techniques, and his thematic preoccupation with the joys and anxieties of the human condition, and particularly the central roles of women in society, reflected a romantic temperament that was also evident in his musical work as a classical tenor. Also on view are Selections from the National Collection, the Pre-Twentieth Century Galleries, The Edna Manley Galleries, The Kapo Galleries and the A.D. Scott Collection, which provide a wide-ranging overview of Jamaica’s artistic and cultural history.

International recording artist Peter Lloyd is one of Jamaica’s most respected entertainers. While he is best known as a singer and songwriter, he entered the creative industry as an actor and has also achieved a highly successful career in film and television and music production. His impressive music catalogue includes four number one singles – Tonight in Japan; Searching in the United States, UK and Jamaica, Oh My Darling in Jamaica and Blood On Your Hands worldwide. In recent years the acclaimed singer has had several Top10 singles, Wake Dem Up, Dance Hall Queen, Pose, and Gold Digga to name a few. Currently Peter Lloyd’s newest single Pure Love is poised to be the singer’s next major hit, with the momentum it has generated since its release in March 2016. Peter Lloyd is one of the finest live performers in the Reggae genre and has headlined major festivals and shows across Europe, United States of America and Jamaica. Among the singer’s notable achievements is a feature on CNN’s ROOTS: Our Journeys Home, becoming one of an exclusive group of reggae artiste to appear on CNN. “I give 100% for my fans; my life means nothing without them. My purpose is to heal the world, that’s why they call me the Love Messenger,” says Peter Lloyd.

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Peter Lloyd

As is customary, admission will be free on October 30 and there will also be free tours, but contributions to the National Gallery’s donations box are always appreciated. The NGJ gift and coffee shops will be open for business and proceeds from these ventures help to fund programmes such as Last Sundays. The gift shop is fully stocked for the Christmas gift-buying season.

Last Sundays, September 25, 2016 – feat. Quilt and Kingston

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The National Gallery of Jamaica’s Last Sundays programme for September 25, 2016, will feature a performance by the award-winning Quilt Performing Arts Company and guided tours of the Kingston – Part 1: The City and Art exhibition.

Kingston – Part 1: The City and Art examines how Jamaica’s turbulent capital city has generated many of the circumstances and opportunities that have propelled the development of Jamaican art, from the natural resources to the economic activities and institutions and the events, big and small, that have marked the city’s history. The exhibition features works of art that date from the late 17th century to the present day and portrays life in the city in all its diversity, seen through the eyes of artists such as Isaac Mendez Belisario, Sidney McLaren, David Pottinger, Osmond Watson, Carl Abrahams, Andy Jefferson, Edna Manley, Cecil Baugh, Kapo, Michael Lester and Roy Reid. The exhibition also features the iconic Jamaican feature film The Harder They Come (1972, dir. Perry Henzell), which is in many ways also a portrait of Kingston and, particularly, a time capsule of life in the city in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Kingston was curated by National Gallery Assistant Curator Monique Barnett-Davidson and continues until October 30, 2016.

The Quilt Performing Arts Company was born out of a need for a fresh, new, innovative way of creating performance art. Using Caribbean rhythms, merging poetry, dance and music, the Quilt performers have developed their own unique performance style and an evolving devised theatre technique. The performance at Last Sundays on September 25 will of consist Revolution (2016) and a new work that is yet to be titled. Revolution looks at hegemony and the ‘zombification’ of the human race. It travels through stage vignettes from the slave ships to the sound boxes of Kingston.  Artistic director Rayon Mclean and his team continue break boundaries and redefine performance spaces. This is the company’s second time in the National Gallery and the members are pumped up about serving of cocktail of art and heart.

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The National Gallery’s doors will be open from 11 am to 4 pm on Sunday, September 25, 2016 and the Quilt performance will start at 1:30 pm. Admission and guided tours will be free, but contributions to the National Gallery’s donations box are gratefully accepted. The National Gallery gift and coffee shops will also be open and the gift shop is stocked for the Christmas gift-buying season. Proceeds from these ventures help to fund exhibitions and programmes such as Last Sundays.