Panel Discussion “Kingston: Filming The City” – October 27 @ 2 pm


On Thursday, October 27, 2016, starting at 2:00 pm, the National Gallery of Jamaica will be hosting a panel discussion entitled Kingston: Filming the City. This event aims to explore the the work of filmmakers in depicting and interpreting Kingston life and its environs. Kingston: Filming the City is part of the educational programming associated with the NGJ’s current feature exhibition Kingston, Part 1: The City and Art, which opened on July 31 and will now close on November 5. The exhibition utilizes paintings, sculpture, ceramics, film and photography to explore the dynamic between Kingston’s growth as a major commercial as well as cultural centre and the development of Jamaican visual art practice and infrastructure.

The focus on film for the panel discussion was inspired by the inclusion of two motion-picture works in the exhibition: Chaotic Beauty (2016), a video by emerging Jamaican digital artist Di-Andre Caprice Davis, and The Harder They Come (1972), the iconic Jamaican film directed by Perry Henzell and written by himself and Trevor Rhone. Both of these productions have featured Kingston not just as a backdrop to story-telling, but as a key location element that informs narrative progression and character development. Some have argued that The Harder They Come is also a portrait of Kingston and a time-capsule representation of urban life in Jamaica in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Kingston has featured in several other memorable, locally produced and international films, including the first James Bond film Dr No (1962), Rockers (1978), Dancehall Queen (1997), Third World Cop (1999), Better Mus’ Come (2010) and Kingston Paradise (2013). Kingston also serves as the locale and backdrop to numerous Jamaican and other music videos, such as Proteje’s Kingston Be Wise (2013).

The discussion on October 27 will be moderated by lecturer of Audio-Visual History at the University of the West Indies (Mona), Dr. Julian Cresser, along with the following panellists:

  • Franklyn “Chappy” St. Juste, veteran cinematographer who has been credited in films such as The Harder They Come (1972), Children of Babylon (1980) and Coolie Pink and Green (2009). St. Juste has also contributed valuable years of service to the Jamaica Information Service (JIS), Creative Production and Training Centre (CPTC) and the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication (CARIMAC).
  • Natalie Thompson, film producer and managing director of Cinecom. Some of Thompson’s acclaimed productions have included Third World Cop (1999), Knight and Day (2010) and the Marley documentary (2012).
  • Nile Saulter, cinematographer and film director as well as founding member of New Caribbean Cinema. Some of his notable productions include Coast (2011), Pillowman (2013) and Everblessed (2016), a collaboration between himself and Canadian journalist Jeremy Relph.
  • Randall Richards, emerging photographer, videographer and one of the founders of ARRC Creative Media Ltd. Richards’ recent productions have included the music video for music single by Reggae artiste Protogé, Kingston Be Wise (2013).

Also as an accompanying mini-campaign to the Kingston: Filming The City panel discussion, persons are being invited to create 10 to 20 second videos about Kingston and post them to the NGJ Education Department Facebook page, using the hashtag #ngjkingstonfilm. The final day for posting will be on November 4, 2016. All posts will be reviewed by the National Gallery of Jamaica before appearing on the page’s timeline.

The panel discussion is free and open to the public. Persons in attendance will also have an opportunity to view the Kingston, Part 1: The City and Art exhibition.

Saturday Art-Time is Back!

saturday art time september 2016


The National Gallery of Jamaica (NGJ) is pleased to announce the resumption of its child art programme, Saturday Art-Time, on Saturday September 10, 2016.

The programme, which has been active since September 2009, has been on hiatus since March 2015.  Having renewed grant funding, the NGJ’s Education Department is looking forward to presenting new workshop activities to participants alongside staple programme art-making offerings such as drawing, painting, assemblage and collage. With new offerings such as animation, the young participants of Saturday Art-Time will continue to be given opportunities to learn about Jamaican culture and history through the gallery’s permanent collection as well as its temporary exhibitions.

Geared towards participants aged 8 to 15 years old, Saturday Art-Time has been a popular part of the National Gallery of Jamaica’s programming for its younger patrons and has been favoured by participants from a variety of social backgrounds. The present workshop series will be held during the 2016-2017 school year, with the first semester ending on December 10, 2016. The programme will also be accompanied by a child art exhibition entitled Art’iT, which was was previously held in 2011 and 2013 and reflects the effectiveness of the workshops and the enthusiastic participation of the children. Through Art’iT, which will be held towards the end of the school year, the programmes child artists receive a public platform on which they can exhibit their art and contribute to the diversity of the Jamaican artistic community.

The workshops, funded by the Culture, Health, Arts, Sports and Education fund (CHASE), will be held every Saturday morning from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the National Gallery of Jamaica. The workshops will continue to be free of cost, but space is limited so applicants are encouraged to register as soon as possible. Registration forms are available at the National Gallery. For more information, contact the National Gallery’s Education Department at 922-1561/3 (Lime landline) or 618-0654/5 (Digicel fixed line) or via e-mail at




NGJ to Host Second Edition of WRITIVITY Workshop

Writivity 2  (1)-1

The National Gallery of Jamaica (NGJ) is proud to announce that it will be holding the second edition of its workshop programme, WRITIVITY, which begins on Monday, August 8 and will continue until Friday, August 12, 2016. Inaugurated last year, the WRITIVTY workshop is designed for grade 10 and 11 students, who are preparing to sit Visual Arts examinations for the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC). The workshop is coordinated by the NGJ’s Education Department and forms part of the Gallery’s summer programme schedule.

The main goal of WRITIVITY is to assist students with the development of a visual arts reflective journal, which is a key component of CSEC’s School Based Assessment (SBA) submission. By participating in WRITIVITY, students will be taught how to properly prepare entries for the journal, analyze art pieces and conduct art related research, within sessions utilize the NGJ’s art collection and document resources.

All activities for the WRITIVITY will be held at the National Gallery of Jamaica from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Persons interested in the workshop should contact the NGJ in order to register. The cost of registration is one thousand dollars ($1000) and due to limited space, applicants are being encouraged to register early. For additional information, kindly contact the National Gallery’s Education Department at 922-1561 / 3 (Lime landline), or 618-0654 / 5 (Digicel fixed line). Emailed queries should be sent to

Panel Discussion and Twitter Chat: Digital Art- Potential and Possibilities

Panel Discussion - June-01

The closing event for the National Gallery of Jamaica’s Digital exhibition will be a panel discussion and Twitter chat on the possibilities and potential of digital art and its role in redefining contemporary art. This panel discussion will be held at the National Gallery on Saturday, July 2, 2016, starting at 1 pm and will feature four digital artists, Corretta Singer, David Gumbs, Shane McHugh and Danielle Russell. The latter three are are represented in the Digital exhibition.

The panel discussion will be organized around four major discussion points:

  1. What Makes Digital Art ART? – an exploration of definitions, understandings, commonalities and peculiarities of digital art.
  2. The Challenge of New Media –  a discussion of how material value is treated in or can be ascribed to digital artworks; what are the conventional expectations of the ‘art object’ and how do the media used for digital art challenge these expectations?
  3. Exposure, Accessibility and Audience Reach – Does digital art afford greater/lesser potential for the aforementioned for the artists/designers as well as the audience? What are the ramifications concerning copyright and other legal protection for the creators of digital artwork?
  4. Rethinking Patronage – to what extent can the conventions of collecting artwork be applied to digital art? Is there a possibility that the traditional art collector may become marginalized as more artists produce in this way or can the rise in prevalence of digital artwork provide more diverse ways of encouraging varieties of patronage?

The panel discussion will be accompanied by a Twitter chat for members of the audience and persons who are not able to come to the gallery for the event, including some of the artists in the Digital exhibition. All that is required is that they follow the National Gallery of Jamaica’s Twitter account, @natgalleryja and include #NGJDigital in their comments or questions. Participants in the Twitter chat can begin tweeting by 12 noon on the day.

The panel discussion is free and open to the public. Persons in attendance will also have a final opportunity to view the Digital exhibition.

Panel Discussion on Masculinities @March 17, 1:30 pm

Panel Discussion - Masculinties Flyer

The National Gallery of Jamaica is staging a panel discussion to accompany its Explorations IV: Masculinities exhibition. This panel discussion will take place on Thursday, March 17, starting at 1:30 pm, at the National Gallery of Jamaica, and will be followed by a curatorial tour of the exhibition.

Moderated by Senior Curator O’Neil Lawrence, the panel will include Lecturer in Sociology, Psychology and Social Work, Dr Moji Anderson; Gender and Social Research Specialist, Suzanne Charles-Watson; Lecturer in Anthropology (Qualitative research), Dr Herbert Gayle; and dancer and choreographer Kevin Ormsby. Using the various themes presented in the Masculinities exhibition as their contextual framework, the panellists will engage with the social and cultural issues explored within the exhibition, particularly with how masculinities are understood, enacted and contested in Jamaican society.

The Masculinities exhibition is part of the National Gallery’s Explorations series, which explores major themes in Jamaican art and the critical issues in Jamaican society these themes represent. The series also creates a dialogue between contemporary, modern and historical art produced in and about Jamaica, yielding new insights about Jamaican art and society in the process. Its current edition Explorations IV: Masculinities looks at the varied ways in which the concept of Jamaican masculinities have been represented, and at times challenged, within the visual arts.

The Masculinities panel discussion on March 17 is free and open to the public, as is the curatorial tour which follows after. The Explorations IV: Masculinities exhibition was originally scheduled to close on March 5 but has been extended until March 26.

Saturday Art-Time is Back with “The Super Six Workshops”

Saturday - Super Six

The National Gallery of Jamaica is excited to announce that its premier child art programme, Saturday Art-Time, will be hosting a six-week workshop series for children, entitled The Super Six Workshops. The series will be held at the National Gallery every Saturday from January 30 to March 5,  2016,

Saturday Art-Time – which has been active since 2009 – is one of the National Gallery’s most successful museum education programmes and consists of a range of gallery-based art workshops for children 8 to 15 years old. The programme was designed to foster visual art expressions by children and encourage them to think and speak intelligently and critically about artworks. By utilizing the National Gallery’s permanent collection as a reference point for assignments, the students also learn much about Jamaican visual arts and culture. During its existence, Saturday Art-Time has also created and facilitated opportunities for participating child artists to exhibit their artworks, particularly in the Art’iT exhibition series.

The Super Six Workshops will take place every Saturday from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm and will focus on one of two exciting topic areas: an Introduction to Basic Printmaking for participants aged 8 to 11 years old and Basic Animation for participants aged 12 to 15 years old. For further information, please contact the National Gallery of Jamaica at 922-1561/3 (Flow landline), or 618-0654/5 (Digicel fixed line). Emailed queries should be sent to Registrations forms for the workshops can be downloaded here or you can collect them at our offices at 12 Ocean Boulevard, Kingston. You can also find and ‘Like’ the National Gallery of Jamaica as well as the NGJ Education Department fan pages on Facebook. See you there!