We Have Met Before – Ingrid Pollard

We Have Met Before opens at the National Gallery of Jamaica on September 22 and continues until November 4. The works selected for this exhibition represent a conversation on the histories of Slavery, the Transatlantic trade, and its present-day implications. The exhibition is staged in partnership with the British Council. Ingrid Pollard is one of the four artists featured.

Bio

Ingrid Pollard was born in 1953 in Georgetown, Guyana and is based in London. Pollard completed a BA in Film and Video at the London College of Printing in 1988. She went on to complete an MA in Photographic Studies at Derby University in 1995 and obtained a PhD from Westminster University in 2010. She lectures in Photography at Kingston University. Ingrid Pollard played an important role in early 1980s photography in Britain, documenting black people’s creativity and presence in photographic series that question social constructs such as Britishness and racial difference. Her work is included in major collections internationally and nationally in Tate Britain and the Victoria & Albert Museums in the UK.

 

Ingrid Pollard

About the Work

Ingrid Pollard works mainly in analogue photographic media, with emphasis on the materiality of the photographic media and processes. The Boy Who Watches Ships Go By (2002) is the oldest body of work in We Have Met Before and consists of images of land, sea, boats and historical documents that subtly evoke the histories, visible and invisible, of Sunderland Point in northern England, which was once a thriving seaport in the Triangular Trade. The resulting narrative revolves around the story of Sambo, a young boy and servant, presumably enslaved, who travelled with the captain of the Globe from Kingston, Jamaica, who fell ill and died when he arrived in England. His death, it was believed, was from a disease he allegedly contracted in England to which he had no immunity; and acts as a metaphor for the fate of those who lost their lives and freedom as a result of their contact with European slave traders. Sambo was, according to local lore, buried at Sunderland Point in 1739.

 

Ingrid Pollard website: www.ingridpollard.com

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